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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2013 Dec 2;369(1633):20130288. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2013.0288. Print 2014 Jan 5.

The synaptic plasticity and memory hypothesis: encoding, storage and persistence.

Author information

1
Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems, University of Edinburgh, , 1 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK.

Abstract

The synaptic plasticity and memory hypothesis asserts that activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is induced at appropriate synapses during memory formation and is both necessary and sufficient for the encoding and trace storage of the type of memory mediated by the brain area in which it is observed. Criteria for establishing the necessity and sufficiency of such plasticity in mediating trace storage have been identified and are here reviewed in relation to new work using some of the diverse techniques of contemporary neuroscience. Evidence derived using optical imaging, molecular-genetic and optogenetic techniques in conjunction with appropriate behavioural analyses continues to offer support for the idea that changing the strength of connections between neurons is one of the major mechanisms by which engrams are stored in the brain.

KEYWORDS:

dopamine; engram; initial consolidation; long-term potentiation; memory; synaptic plasticity

PMID:
24298167
PMCID:
PMC3843897
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2013.0288
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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