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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 May;210(5):435.e1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2013.11.039. Epub 2013 Dec 1.

Racial and ethnic disparities in severe maternal morbidity: a multistate analysis, 2008-2010.

Author information

1
Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. Electronic address: acreanga@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
3
Division of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
4
Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to examine racial and ethnic disparities in severe maternal morbidity during delivery hospitalizations in the United States.

STUDY DESIGN:

We identified delivery hospitalizations from 2008-2010 in State Inpatient Databases from 7 states. We used International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, codes to create severe maternal morbidity indicators during delivery hospitalizations. We calculated the rates of severe maternal morbidity that were measured with and without blood transfusion for 5 racial/ethnic groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women. Poisson regression models were fitted to explore the associations between race/ethnicity and severe maternal morbidity after we controlled for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Overall, severe maternal morbidity rates that were measured with and without blood transfusion were 150.7 and 64.3 per 10,000 delivery hospitalizations, respectively. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women had 2.1, 1.3, 1.2, and 1.7 times (all P < .05), respectively, higher rates of severe morbidity that were measured with blood transfusion compared with non-Hispanic white women; similar increased rates were observed when severe morbidity was measured without blood transfusion. Other significant positive predictors of severe morbidity were age <20 and ≥30 years, self-pay or Medicaid coverage for delivery, low socioeconomic status, and presence of chronic medical conditions.

CONCLUSION:

Severe maternal morbidity disproportionally affects racial/ethnic minority women, especially non-Hispanic black women. There is a need for a systematic review of severe maternal morbidities at the facility, state, and national levels to guide the development of quality improvement interventions to reduce the racial/ethnic disparities in severe maternal morbidity.

KEYWORDS:

ethnicity; race; severe maternal morbidity

PMID:
24295922
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2013.11.039
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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