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Cryobiology. 2014 Feb;68(1):65-70. doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.11.008. Epub 2013 Nov 27.

The value of frozen cartilage tissues without cryoprotection for genetic conservation.

Author information

  • 1TUBITAK MRC-Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Institute (GEBI), 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli, Turkey. Electronic address: gayecet@gmail.com.
  • 2TUBITAK MRC-Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Institute (GEBI), 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli, Turkey. Electronic address: ibrahim.hatipoglu@tubitak.gov.tr.
  • 3Namık Kemal University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Tekirdağ, Turkey. Electronic address: sarat@nku.edu.tr.

Abstract

Animal tissues frozen without cryoprotection are thought to be inappropriate for use as a donor for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) studies. Cells in tissues that have been frozen without a cryoprotectant are commonly thought to be dead or to have lost genomic integrity. However, in this study we show that the frozen auricular cartilage tissues of anatolian buffalo contain a considerable number of viable healthy cells. The cells in auricular cartilage tissues are resistant to cryo-injury at -80°C. Primary cell cultures were established from defrosted ear tissues which were frozen without cryoprotectant. The growth and functional characteristics of primary cell cultures are characterized according to cell growth curve, cell cycle analysis, karyotype and GAG synthesis. The results indicate that frozen cartilage tissues could be valuable materials for the conservation of species and SCNT technology.

KEYWORDS:

Biobanking; Cartilage; Conservation; Cryoinjury; Gene preservation

PMID:
24291088
DOI:
10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.11.008
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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