Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Patient Educ Couns. 2014 Feb;94(2):276-81. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2013.10.022. Epub 2013 Nov 6.

How are the English Stop Smoking Services responding to growth in use of electronic cigarettes?

Author information

1
Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, UK; National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training, London, UK. Electronic address: e.beard@ucl.ac.uk.
2
National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training, London, UK; UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), Addictions, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK.
3
Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, UK.
4
Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, UK; National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training, London, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess extent of electronic cigarette use by smokers attending Stop Smoking Services, the advice given about electronic cigarettes and whether this usage is recorded.

METHODS:

Fifty-eight managers and 1284 practitioners completed an online survey. Questions covered use of electronic cigarettes, the advice given and whether use was recorded in client databases.

RESULTS:

Ninety per cent (n=1150) and 95% (n=1215) of practitioners respectively, reported that their clients were using electronic cigarettes and that they had been asked about them. Seventy-one per cent (n=41) of managers reported that they had a policy on the advice to be given; of whom 85% (n=35) said that practitioners should say that products were unlicensed. Fifty-five per cent (n=707) of practitioners reported giving such advice and 11% (n=138) said they warned smokers about their safety. Only 9% (n=119) reported that they recorded clients' use.

CONCLUSION:

Although use of electronic cigarettes by smokers in Stop Smoking Services is common, few provisions are in place to record their use. Practitioners mostly advise that products are not licensed.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS:

There is a need to consider additional training for practitioners on use of e-cigarettes and harm reduction generally to ensure that advice is consistent and evidence-based.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic cigarettes; Practitioners; Smoking; Stop Smoking Services

PMID:
24290243
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2013.10.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center