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J Orthop Surg Res. 2013 Dec 1;8:44. doi: 10.1186/1749-799X-8-44.

Secondary prevention of osteoporosis in non-neck of femur fragility fractures: is it value for money? A retrospective, prospective and cross-sectional cohort study.

Author information

1
Orthopaedic Department, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. Tameradeldawoud@yahoo.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Osteoporosis is one of the commonest bone diseases in which bone fragility is increased. Over 300,000 patients present to hospitals in the UK with fragility fractures each year, with medical and social care costs - most of which relate to hip fracture care - at around £2 billion. The number of these fractures rises by 2% a year. The 30 days mortality is 10% and 30% at 1 year. The purpose of this study is to review the current practice according to NICE and BOA guidelines of secondary prevention of osteoporosis and to suggest changes to these guidelines.

METHODS:

Patients over 50 years old admitted as inpatients to our facility with non-neck-of-femur (NOF) fragility fractures in March and September 2008 were studied. Retrospectively (March), looking for risk factors and if treated or not, then prospectively (September), after introducing the new trauma admission sheet. Also cross-sectional study was performed by comparing the services provided for NOF and non-NOF fragility fractures in September. Two-sample t test is used to compare between percentages.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine percent of fragility fractures are non-NOF fractures with a mean age of 70 years, while the remaining 71% are NOF fractures with a mean age of 80 years. There is a great difference in the care provided to these patients: non-NOF fragility fractures got less attention for assessment of osteoporosis (25%) and obtained less interest in investigations by medical staff (11%) and, finally, less intentions to treat osteoporosis (35%), compared to NOF fractures in which 35% of cases were assessed, 47% were investigated and 71% were treated for osteoporosis. Twenty-five percent of NOF fracture patients were found to have previous fragility fractures in the preceding years, while only 6% were on osteoporosis treatment before the fracture.

CONCLUSION:

Osteoporosis (a new epidemic) is the most common disease of the bone and its incidence is rising rapidly as the population ages. Though treatable, it is often left untreated. We believe that treating patients with non-NOF fragility fractures from osteoporosis before proceeding to NOF fractures would improve their quality of life and reduce the burden on hospital services and funding.

PMID:
24289492
PMCID:
PMC4222047
DOI:
10.1186/1749-799X-8-44
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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