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BMC Med Educ. 2013 Dec 1;13:156. doi: 10.1186/1472-6920-13-156.

Content analysis of medical students' seminars: a unique method of analyzing clinical thinking.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA. jerrydoc@ufl.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The study of communication skills of Asian medical students during structured Problem-based Learning (PBL) seminars represented a unique opportunity to assess their critical thinking development. This study reports the first application of the health education technology, content analysis (CA), to a Japanese web-based seminar (webinar).

METHODS:

The authors assigned twelve randomly selected medical students from two universities and two clinical instructors to two virtual classrooms for four PBL structured tutoring sessions that were audio-video captured for CA. Both of the instructors were US-trained physicians. This analysis consisted of coding the students' verbal comments into seven types, ranging from trivial to advanced knowledge integration comments that served as a proxy for clinical thinking.

RESULTS:

The most basic level of verbal simple responses accounted for a majority (85%) of the total students' verbal comments. Only 15% of the students' comments represented more advanced types of critical thinking. The male students responded more than the female students; male students attending University 2 responded more than male students from University 1. The total mean students' verbal response time for the four sessions with the male instructor was 6.9%; total mean students' verbal response time for the four sessions with the female instructor was 19% (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

This report is the first to describe the application of CA to a multi-university real time audio and video PBL medical student clinical training webinar in two Japanese medical schools. These results are preliminary, mostly limited by a small sample size (n = 12) and limited time frame (four sessions). CA technology has the potential to improve clinical thinking for medical students. This report may stimulate improvements for implementation.

PMID:
24289320
PMCID:
PMC4220556
DOI:
10.1186/1472-6920-13-156
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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