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Prev Med. 2014 Feb;59:47-53. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.11.017. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Association between being employed in a smoke-free workplace and living in a smoke-free home: evidence from 15 low and middle income countries.

Author information

1
Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), New Delhi, India; London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), UK. Electronic address: gaurang.nazar@ext.phfi.org.
2
Imperial College London, UK.
3
University of California San Francisco (UCSF), USA.
4
Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), New Delhi, India.
5
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), UK.
6
Imperial College London, UK; South Asia Network for Chronic Diseases (SANCD), New Delhi, India.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether being employed in a smoke-free workplace is associated with living in a smoke-free home in 15 low and middle income countries (LMICs).

METHODS:

Country-specific individual level analyses of cross-sectional Global Adult Tobacco Survey data (2008-2011) from 15 LMICs was conducted using multiple logistic regression. The dependent variable was living in a smoke-free home; the independent variable was being employed in a smoke-free workplace. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, residence, region, education, occupation, current smoking, current smokeless tobacco use and number of household members. Individual country results were combined in a random effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

In each country, the percentage of participants employed in a smoke-free workplace who reported living in a smoke-free home was higher than those employed in a workplace not smoke-free. The adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of living in a smoke-free home among participants employed in a smoke-free workplace (vs. those employed where smoking occurred) were statistically significant in 13 of the 15 countries, ranging from 1.12 [95% CI 0.79-1.58] in Uruguay to 2.29 [1.37-3.83] in China. The pooled AOR was 1.61 [1.46-1.79].

CONCLUSION:

In LMICs, employment in a smoke-free workplace is associated with living in a smoke-free home. Accelerated implementation of comprehensive smoke-free policies is likely to result in substantial population health benefits in these settings.

KEYWORDS:

GATS; Low- and middle-income countries; Secondhand smoke; Smoke-free policy; Tobacco; Workplace

PMID:
24287123
PMCID:
PMC3898883
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.11.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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