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Infect Genet Evol. 2014 Jan;21:198-204. doi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2013.11.015. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Phylogeography and evolutionary history of rodent-borne hantaviruses.

Author information

1
Virology Research Center, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto of University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: wmarciel@hotmail.com.
2
Laboratório de AIDS & Imunologia Molecular, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
3
Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Toxicológicas e Bromatológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.
4
Virology Research Center, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto of University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: ltmfigue@fmrp.usp.br.

Abstract

Hantavirus (Family Bunyaviridae) are mostly associated to rodents and transmitted to man by inhalation of aerosolized infected excreta of these animals. The human infection by hantaviruses can lead to severe diseases such as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Asia and Europe, and pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the Americas. To determine the origin, spreading and evolutionary dynamics of rodent-borne hantaviruses, 190 sequences of nucleoprotein (N) of hantaviruses identified in 30 countries, from 1985 to 2010, were retrieved from the GenBank and analyzed using the BEAST program. Our evolutionary analysis indicates that current genetic diversity of N gene of rodent-borne hantaviruses probably was originated around 2000 years ago. Hantavirus harbored by Murinae and Arvicolinae subfamilies, probably, were originated in Asia 500-700 years ago and later spread toward Siberia, Europe, Africa and North America. Hantavirus carried by Neotominae subfamily, probably, emerged 500-600 years ago in Central America and spread toward North America. Finally, hantaviruses associated to Sigmodontinae occurred in Brazil 400 years ago and were, probably, originated from Neotominae-associated virus from northern South America. These data offer subsidies to understand the time-scale and worldwide dissemination dynamics of rodent-borne hantaviruses.

KEYWORDS:

Evolution; Hantavirus; Phylogeography; Rodent-borne

PMID:
24287104
DOI:
10.1016/j.meegid.2013.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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