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J Ethnopharmacol. 2014 Feb 3;151(2):820-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2013.11.034. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants in Kotli Sattian, Rawalpindi district, Pakistan.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Science, International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan. Electronic address: zafeer@iiu.edu.pk.
2
Environmental Biology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, Department of Plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, PO 45320, Pakistan. Electronic address: adilqau5@gmail.com.
3
Environmental Biology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, PO 45320, Pakistan.
4
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan.
5
Department of Environmental Science, International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan.
6
Department of Plant Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, PO 45320, Pakistan.

Abstract

AIM OF STUDY:

The present study aimed to report the ethnomedicinal information from Kotli Sattian, district Rawalpindi for detailed medicinal uses and to inform the community about conservation of medicinal plant diversity and ethnomedicinal knowledge of plants.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Ethnomedicinal data were collected via Rapid Appraisal Approach (RAA) along with interview, group meetings with local people having awareness about medicinal knowledge of plants and individual meetings with local healers.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS:

This study reported eighty seven (87) indigenous medicinal plants, distributed among fifty five (55) families and seventy nine (79) genera. Among these, herbs contributed 43%, trees 28%, shrubs 21% and climbing plants 8%. About 34% of herbal preparations were made from whole plants followed by the leaves (27%), fruits (08%), bark (06%), seeds (05%), root (05%), rhizome (04%), stem, flower, gum, pod and tubers (02%) and milky latex (01%). Justicia adhatoda showed the maximum use value (0.91) while Cuscuta reflexa showed the least use value (0.11).

CONCLUSION:

Elder people in the study area still rely on herbal remedies although the modern heath care facilities are present in the study area; thus, the indigenous plants remain important medicines in solving health problems.

KEYWORDS:

Etno-medicines; Indigenous knowledge; Kotli Sattian; Local healers; Rapid appraisal approach

PMID:
24286963
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2013.11.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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