Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2014 Jan;23(1):57-64. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2013.4397. Epub 2013 Nov 27.

Individual, provider, and system risk factors for breast and cervical cancer screening among underserved Black, Latina, and Arab women.

Author information

1
1 Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University , East Lansing, Michigan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening persist. An exploratory study was conducted to better understand co-occurring risk factors in underserved groups that could inform interventions to improve screening adherence. The objective of this study was to examine associations between breast and cervical cancer screening adherence and co-occurring risk factors in three racial/ethnic groups of underserved women.

METHODS:

Black, Latina, and Arab women (N=514), ages 21 to 70 years, were enrolled into the Kin Keeper(SM) randomized controlled trial in communities around Detroit, Michigan. We used participant baseline assessments (e.g., demographic characteristics, health literacy) to explore screening risks using an additive approach and multivariate logistic analyses.

RESULTS:

For black women, having more health literacy risks were associated with reduced odds of a clinical breast exam (CBE), mammogram, and Papanicolaou (Pap) test; more competing priorities were associated with reduced odds of a Pap test; lack of doctor mammogram recommendation was significantly associated with decreased odds of CBE. For Latina women, lack of doctor recommendations were significantly associated with decreased odds of CBE, mammogram, and Pap test. For Arab women, lack of doctor recommendations were significantly associated with decreased odds of CBE, mammogram, and Pap test; more competing priorities were significantly associated with reduced odds of CBE and Pap test. All results were significant at p<0.05.

CONCLUSIONS:

Characteristics associated with breast and cervical screening adherence differs among Black, Latina, and Arab underserved women. Interventions to improve screening should be tailored for racial/ethnic groups with particular attention to competing survival priorities, health literacy risks factors, and provider recommendations.

PMID:
24283674
PMCID:
PMC4056454
DOI:
10.1089/jwh.2013.4397
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center