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Plast Reconstr Surg. 2013 Dec;132(6):1733-41. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3182a80925.

Evidence-based medicine: lower extremity acute trauma.

Author information

1
Bethlehem and Allentown, Pa. From the Division of Plastic Surgery, St. Luke's Hospital; Sacred Heart Hospital; and Lehigh Valley Hospital.

Abstract

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the steps for evaluation of a patient with a lower extremity wound before initiating medical or surgical intervention. 2. Acknowledge that limb amputation and salvage can both be appropriate definitive treatment options. 3. Select proper nonsurgical or surgical techniques for wound management. 4. Appreciate the difference in the expected outcome according to the perspective of the physician versus the patient.

SUMMARY:

Lower extremity acute trauma is a common occurrence. Ultimate functional outcomes are similar whether amputation or salvage by limb reconstruction is the treatment pathway chosen. The reconstructive surgeon must be knowledgeable enough to assist in making the correct decision for either option. D├ębridement is the cornerstone of management before embarking on definitive wound closure. Nonsurgical devices have provided a transition to optimize the wound, sometimes even replacing or lessening the need for vascularized tissues to permit this coverage. Nevertheless, flaps will always have a role varying according to the involved region of the lower extremity. Traditional muscle flaps can often today be supplemented by the use of perforator flaps. The latter have great versatility as pedicled flaps for all zones of the lower limb, in addition to being a dependable free flap alternative. Horrendous injuries can now be expected to be salvaged, with a reasonable aesthetic result possible and with minimal donor-site morbidity. Preferences by both physicians and patients tend to favor the course to limb salvage, but it must be appreciated by the caregiver that it is always the patient who has to live with the residua of an altered limb and lifestyle.

PMID:
24281598
DOI:
10.1097/PRS.0b013e3182a80925
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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