Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Public Health (Oxf). 2014 Dec;36(4):577-86. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdt117. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Chronic kidney disease, albuminuria and socioeconomic status in the Health Surveys for England 2009 and 2010.

Author information

1
Academic Unit of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, South Academic Block, Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, Hampshire SO16 6YD, UK.
2
Geography and Environment, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK.
3
Research Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, UCL (University College London), London WC1E 6BT, UK.
4
Department of Renal Medicine, Salford Royal Foundation Trust, Salford M6 8HD, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Renal replacement therapy rates are inversely related to socioeconomic status (SES) in developed countries. The relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and SES is less clear. This study examined the relationships between SES and CKD and albuminuria in England.

METHODS:

Data from the Health Survey for England 2009 and 2010 were combined. The prevalence of CKD 3-5 and albuminuria was calculated, and logistic regression used to determine their association with five individual-level measures and one area-level measure of SES.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of CKD 3-5 was 5.2% and albuminuria 8.0%. Age-sex-adjusted CKD 3-5 was associated with lack of qualifications [odds ratio (OR) 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.40-3.69)], low income [OR 1.50 (1.02-2.21)] and renting tenure [OR 1.36 (1.01-1.84)]. Only tenure remained significant in fully adjusted models suggesting that co-variables were on the causal pathway. Albuminuria remained associated with several SES measures on full adjustment: low income [OR 1.55 (1.14-2.11)], no vehicle [OR 1.38 (1.05-1.81)], renting [OR 1.31 [1.03-1.67)] and most deprived area-level quintile [OR 1.55 (1.07-2.25)].

CONCLUSIONS:

CKD 3-5 and albuminuria were associated with low SES using several measures. For albuminuria this was not explained by known measured causal factors.

KEYWORDS:

chronic kidney disease; epidemiology; socioeconomic factors

PMID:
24277777
DOI:
10.1093/pubmed/fdt117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center