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Appl Ergon. 2014 Jul;45(4):857-64. doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2013.11.002. Epub 2013 Nov 23.

Exploring physical exposures and identifying high-risk work tasks within the floor layer trade.

Author information

1
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.
2
Université de Versailles St-Quentin - Inserm, UMRS 1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Research Platform, Occupational health Unit, Garches, France.
3
The Center for Construction Research and Training CPWR, 8484 Georgia Ave, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.
4
University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave, Lowell, MA 01854, USA.
5
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. Electronic address: adale@dom.wustl.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Floor layers have high rates of musculoskeletal disorders yet few studies have examined their work exposures. This study used observational methods to describe physical exposures within floor laying tasks.

METHODS:

We analyzed 45 videos from 32 floor layers using Multimedia-Video Task Analysis software to determine the time in task, forces, postures, and repetitive hand movements for installation of four common flooring materials. We used the WISHA checklists to define exposure thresholds.

RESULTS:

Most workers (91%) met the caution threshold for one or more exposures. Workers showed high exposures in multiple body parts with variability in exposures across tasks and for different materials. Prolonged exposures were seen for kneeling, poor neck and low back postures, and intermittent but frequent hand grip forces.

CONCLUSIONS:

Floor layers experience prolonged awkward postures and high force physical exposures in multiple body parts, which probably contribute to their high rates of musculoskeletal disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Construction trades; Musculoskeletal disorders; Observational assessment

PMID:
24274895
PMCID:
PMC3999260
DOI:
10.1016/j.apergo.2013.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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