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Theriogenology. 2014 Jan 1;81(1):138-51. doi: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2013.09.008.

Ovum pick up, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and somatic cell nuclear transfer in cattle, buffalo and horses: from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

Author information

1
Avantea, Laboratory of Reproductive Technologies, 26100 Cremona, Italy; Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy; Fondazione Avantea, Cremona, Italy. Electronic address: cesaregalli@avantea.it.

Abstract

Assisted reproductive techniques developed for cattle in the last 25 years, like ovum pick up (OPU), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and somatic cell nuclear transfer, have been transferred and adapted to buffalo and horses. The successful clinical applications of these techniques require both the clinical skills specific to each animal species and an experienced laboratory team to support the in vitro phase of the work. In cattle, OPU can be considered a consolidated technology that is rapidly outpacing conventional superovulation for embryo transfer. In buffalo, OPU represents the only possibility for embryo production to advance the implementation of embryo-based biotechnologies in that industry, although it is still mainly in the developmental phase. In the horse, OPU is now an established procedure for breeding from infertile and sporting mares throughout the year. It requires ICSI that in the horse, contrary to what happens in cattle and buffalo, is very efficient and the only option because conventional IVF does not work. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is destined to fill a very small niche for generating animals of extremely high commercial value. The efficiency is low, but because normal animals can be generated it is likely that advancing our knowledge in that field might improve the technology and reduce its cost.

KEYWORDS:

Assisted reproduction; Buffalo; Cattle; Embryo technologies; Horse; Nuclear transfer

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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