Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Child Neurol. 2014 Dec;29(12):1601-7. doi: 10.1177/0883073813509887. Epub 2013 Nov 21.

Effects of youth football on selected clinical measures of neurologic function: a pilot study.

Author information

1
National Institute for Athletic Health & Performance, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Department of Pediatrics, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, SD, USA thayne.munce@sanfordhealth.org.
2
National Institute for Athletic Health & Performance, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, SD, USA.
3
Sanford Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD, USA.
4
Methodology and Data Analysis Division, Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, SD, USA.
5
National Institute for Athletic Health & Performance, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Sanford Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Department of Family Medicine, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, SD, USA.
6
National Institute for Athletic Health & Performance, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Department of Pediatrics, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, SD, USA Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, SD, USA.

Abstract

We assessed 10 youth football players (13.4 ± 0.7 y) immediately before and after their season to explore the effects of football participation on selected clinical measures of neurologic function. Postseason postural stability in a closed-eye condition was improved compared to preseason (P = .017). Neurocognitive testing with the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) battery revealed that reaction time was significantly faster at postseason (P = .015). There were no significant preseason versus postseason differences in verbal memory (P = .507), visual memory (P = .750), or visual motor speed (P = .087). Oculomotor performance assessed by the King-Devick test was moderately to significantly improved (P = .047-.115). A 12-week season of youth football did not impair the postural stability, neurocognitive function, or oculomotor performance measures of the players evaluated. Though encouraging, continued and more comprehensive investigations of this at-risk population are warranted.

KEYWORDS:

balance; neurocognitive; oculomotor; subconcussive

PMID:
24272520
DOI:
10.1177/0883073813509887
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center