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Nat Immunol. 2014 Jan;15(1):45-53. doi: 10.1038/ni.2769. Epub 2013 Nov 24.

Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection.

Author information

1
1] The Centenary Institute, Newtown, New South Wales, Australia. [2].
2
The Centenary Institute, Newtown, New South Wales, Australia.
3
School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
4
Centre for Inflammatory Diseases, Monash University Department of Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
5
Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Biopolis, Singapore.
6
1] The Centenary Institute, Newtown, New South Wales, Australia. [2] Sydney Medical School, New South Wales, Australia.
7
Immune Disease Institute and Division of Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
8
1] The Centenary Institute, Newtown, New South Wales, Australia. [2] Discipline of Dermatology, Sydney Medical School, New South Wales, Australia. [3] Department of Dermatology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in postcapillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we showed that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor α-hemolysin produced by S. aureus lyses perivascular macrophages, which leads to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin and indicate that S. aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy.

PMID:
24270515
PMCID:
PMC4097073
DOI:
10.1038/ni.2769
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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