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Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1):88-92. doi: 10.1038/ng.2835. Epub 2013 Nov 24.

Minke whale genome and aquatic adaptation in cetaceans.

Author information

1
1] Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea. [2].
2
1] Personal Genomics Institute, Genome Research Foundation, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [2].
3
1] Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China. [2].
4
1] Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea. [2] Department of Marine Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
5
1] Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea. [2] Department of Marine Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. [3] Ocean Science and Technology School, Korea Maritime University, Busan, Republic of Korea.
6
Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea.
7
Personal Genomics Institute, Genome Research Foundation, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
8
Theragen BiO Institute, TheragenEtex, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
9
Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
10
Shaanxi Yulin Energy Group Co. Ltd., Yulin, Shaanxi, China.
11
Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
12
Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan, Republic of Korea.
13
Laboratory of Genome Biology, Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
14
Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
15
Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, La Jolla, California, USA.
16
Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
17
College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
18
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
19
Marine Biodiversity Institute of Korea (MABIK), Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries, Sejong, Republic of Korea.
20
Evolutionary Ecology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
21
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.
22
School of Systems Biomedical Science, Soongsil University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
23
1] Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China. [2] Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. [3] King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
24
1] Personal Genomics Institute, Genome Research Foundation, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [2] Theragen BiO Institute, TheragenEtex, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [3] Program in Nano Science and Technology, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [4] Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology Nano Science and Technology, Suwon, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

The shift from terrestrial to aquatic life by whales was a substantial evolutionary event. Here we report the whole-genome sequencing and de novo assembly of the minke whale genome, as well as the whole-genome sequences of three minke whales, a fin whale, a bottlenose dolphin and a finless porpoise. Our comparative genomic analysis identified an expansion in the whale lineage of gene families associated with stress-responsive proteins and anaerobic metabolism, whereas gene families related to body hair and sensory receptors were contracted. Our analysis also identified whale-specific mutations in genes encoding antioxidants and enzymes controlling blood pressure and salt concentration. Overall the whale-genome sequences exhibited distinct features that are associated with the physiological and morphological changes needed for life in an aquatic environment, marked by resistance to physiological stresses caused by a lack of oxygen, increased amounts of reactive oxygen species and high salt levels.

PMID:
24270359
PMCID:
PMC4079537
DOI:
10.1038/ng.2835
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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