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Vet J. 2014 Feb;199(2):210-6. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.09.065. Epub 2013 Oct 4.

Helping working Equidae and their owners in developing countries: monitoring and evaluation of evidence-based interventions.

Author information

1
Department of Production and Population Health, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Melissa.Upjohn@thebrooke.org.
2
Department of Production and Population Health, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, United Kingdom.

Abstract

There are an estimated 112 million Equidae (horses, donkeys, mules) in the developing world, providing essential resources for their owners' livelihoods and well-being. The impoverished situation of their owners and the often harsh conditions in which they work mean that the animals' welfare is a cause for concern. A number of equine non-governmental organisations (NGOs) operate within working equid communities providing veterinary care, education and training programmes aimed at improving equine welfare. However, there is little published information available that describes monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of such interventions using objective outcome-based indicators and where baseline data are available. The aim of this paper is to summarise the peer-reviewed reports of M&E in this sector and identify the key issues which need to be addressed in ensuring that such evaluations provide useful information on the work of these organisations. A rigorous evidence base for designing future interventions will provide an opportunity for enhancing the effectiveness of working equid NGO operations. Increased availability of M&E reports in the peer-reviewed literature will enable NGOs to learn from one another and disseminate to a wider audience information on the role of working Equidae and the issues they face.

KEYWORDS:

Developing country; Evaluation; Impact assessment; Monitoring; Working equid

PMID:
24269105
DOI:
10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.09.065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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