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Clin Neurophysiol. 2014 Mar;125(3):627-34. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2013.08.031. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: the effect of head and body tilt in the roll plane.

Author information

1
Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
3
Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: miriam@icn.usyd.edu.au.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore effects of whole-head/body tilt in the roll plane on ocular-vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP).

METHODS:

Twenty healthy subjects were randomly tilted in an Eply Omniax rotator across a series of eight angles from 0° to 360° (at 45° separations) in the roll plane. At each position, oVEMPs to air-conducted (AC) and bone-conducted (BC) stimulation were recorded from unrectified infra-orbital surface electromyography during upward gaze. oVEMP amplitudes, latencies and amplitude asymmetry were compared across each angle of orientation.

RESULTS:

Head orientation had a significant effect on oVEMP reflex amplitudes for both AC and BC stimulation (p<0.001). For both stimuli there was a trend for lower amplitudes with increasing angular departure from the upright position. Mean amplitudes decreased by 42.6-56.8% (AC) and 23.2-25.5% (BC) when tilted 180°. Roll-plane tilt had a significant effect on amplitude asymmetry ratios recorded in response to AC stimuli (p<0.001), indicating a trend for lower amplitudes from the dependent (down) ear. Amplitude asymmetry ratios for BC stimuli were unaffected by head and body orientation.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results confirm an effect of head and body orientation on oVEMP reflexes recorded in response to air- and bone-conducted stimuli.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The upright position yields an optimal oVEMP response.

KEYWORDS:

Gravitational acceleration; Otolith organs; Static head tilt; oVEMP

PMID:
24268433
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2013.08.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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