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Isr Med Assoc J. 2013 Oct;15(10):622-7.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills retention and self-confidence of preclinical medical students.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sudden cardiac death is the most common lethal manifestation of heart disease and often the first and only indicator. Prompt initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) undoubtedly saves lives. Nevertheless, studies report a low level of competency of medical students in CPR, mainly due to deterioration of skills following training.

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the retention of CPR skills and confidence in delivering CPR by preclinical medical students.

METHODS:

A questionnaire and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) were used to assess confidence and CPR skills among preclinical, second and third-year medical students who had passed a first-aid course during their first year but had not retrained since.

RESULTS:

The study group comprised 64 students: 35 were 1 year after training and 29 were 2 years after training. The groups were demographically similar. Preparedness, recollection and confidence in delivering CPR were significantly lower in the 2 years after training group compared to those 1 year after training (P < 0.05). The mean OSCE score was 19.8 +/- 5.2 (of 27) lower in those 2 years post-training than those 1 year post-training (17.8 +/- 6.35 vs. 21.4 +/- 3.4 respectively, P = 0.009). Only 70% passed the OSCE, considerably less in students 2 years post-training than in those 1 year post-training (52% vs. 86%, P < 0.01). Lowest retention was found in checking safety, pulse check, airway opening, rescue breathing and ventilation technique skills. A 1 year interval was chosen by 81% of the participants as the optimal interval for retraining (91% vs. 71% in the 2 years post-training group vs. the 1 year post- training group respectively, P = 0.08).

CONCLUSIONS:

Confidence and CPR skills of preclinical medical students deteriorate significantly within 1 year post-training, reaching an unacceptable level 2 years post-training. We recommend refresher training at least every year.

PMID:
24266089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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