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Lancet. 2014 Apr 12;383(9925):1333-54. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62231-X. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Advancing social and economic development by investing in women's and children's health: a new Global Investment Framework.

Author information

1
Department of Health Systems Financing, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: stenbergk@who.int.
2
World Health Organization, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
3
Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
4
Independent Consultant, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
5
Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
6
Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
7
UN Population Fund, New York, NY, USA.
8
SickKids Center for Global Child Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; Center of Excellence in Women & Child Health, The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan.
9
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
10
Indendent Consultant, Cali, Colombia.
11
The GAVI Alliance, Geneva, Switzerland.
12
Health Section, UNICEF, UN Plaza, New York, NY, USA.
13
The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, India.
14
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
15
University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
16
The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health, hosted by the World Health Organization, Canada.
17
US Agency for International Development, Washington DC, USA.
18
Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
19
Family, Women's and Children's Health, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

A new Global Investment Framework for Women's and Children's Health demonstrates how investment in women's and children's health will secure high health, social, and economic returns. We costed health systems strengthening and six investment packages for: maternal and newborn health, child health, immunisation, family planning, HIV/AIDS, and malaria. Nutrition is a cross-cutting theme. We then used simulation modelling to estimate the health and socioeconomic returns of these investments. Increasing health expenditure by just $5 per person per year up to 2035 in 74 high-burden countries could yield up to nine times that value in economic and social benefits. These returns include greater gross domestic product (GDP) growth through improved productivity, and prevention of the needless deaths of 147 million children, 32 million stillbirths, and 5 million women by 2035. These gains could be achieved by an additional investment of $30 billion per year, equivalent to a 2% increase above current spending.

PMID:
24263249
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62231-X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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