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J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2014 Sep-Oct;29(5):443-50. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000002.

Return to work following mild traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland (Ms Wäljas and Dr Öhman); University of Tampere Medical School, Tampere, Finland (Ms Wäljas and Drs Hartikainen, Dastidar, Soimakallio, and Öhman); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, and Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Iverson); Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Lange); Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Lange); Department of Neurosciences and Rehabilitation and Emergency Department Acuta, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland (Dr Liimatainen); and Medical Imaging Centre of Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Finland (Drs Dastidar and Soimakallio).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine factors relating to return to work (RTW) following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred and nine patients (Age: M = 37.4 years, SD = 13.2; 52.3% women) who sustained an mTBI.

DESIGN:

Inception cohort design with questionnaires and neuropsychological testing completed approximately 3 to 4 weeks postinjury.

SETTING:

Emergency Department of Tampere University Hospital, Finland.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-report (postconcussion symptoms, depression, fatigue, and general health) and neurocognitive measures (attention and memory).

RESULTS:

The cumulative RTW rates were as follows: 1 week = 46.8%, 2 weeks = 59.6%, 3 weeks = 67.0%, 4 weeks = 70.6%, 2 months = 91.7%, and 1 year = 97.2%. Four variables were significant predictors of the number of days to RTW: age, multiple bodily injuries, intracranial abnormality at the day of injury, and fatigue ratings (all P < .001). The largest amount of variance accounted for by these variables in the prediction of RTW was at 30 days following injury (P < .001, R = 0.504). Participants who returned to work fewer than 30 days after injury (n = 82, 75.2%) versus more than 30 days (n = 27, 24.8%) did not differ on demographic or neuropsychological variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

The vast majority of this cohort returned to work within 2 months. Predictors of slower RTW included age, multiple bodily injuries, intracranial abnormality at the day of injury, and fatigue.

PMID:
24263178
DOI:
10.1097/HTR.0000000000000002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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