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Br J Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;204(1):40-5. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.112.125468. Epub 2013 Nov 21.

Association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorder in the ALSPAC cohort.

Author information

  • 1Carol A. Mathews, MD, Program for Genetics and Epidemiology of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms, Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Jeremiah M. Scharf, MD, PhD, Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Human Genetics Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Laura L. Miller, MSc, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK; Corrie Macdonald-Wallis, PhD, Debbie A. Lawlor, PhD, School of Social and Community Medicine, and MRC Centre for Causal Analyses in Translational Epidemiology, University of Bristol, UK; Yoav Ben-Shlomo, MD, PhD, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorder are heritable but aetiologically complex. Although environment plays a role in their development, existing studies of non-genetic risk factors are inconsistent.

AIMS:

To examine the association between pre- and perinatal exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) prospective longitudinal pre-birth cohort.

METHOD:

Relationships between exposures and Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder were examined in 6090 children using logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Maternal alcohol and cannabis use, inadequate maternal weight gain and parity were associated with Tourette syndrome or Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder. Other previously reported exposures, including birth weight and prenatal maternal smoking, were not associated with Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study supports previously reported relationships between Tourette syndrome/chronic tic disorder and prenatal alcohol exposure, and identifies additional previously unexplored potential prenatal risk factors.

PMID:
24262815
PMCID:
PMC3877832
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.112.125468
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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