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J Clin Epidemiol. 2014 Jan;67(1):108-13. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.07.016.

Method of administration of PROMIS scales did not significantly impact score level, reliability, or validity.

Author information

1
National Research Centre for the Working Environment Lersø Park Alle 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; QualityMetric, Optum PatientInsight, 24 Albion Road, Lincoln, RI 02865, USA; Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark. Electronic address: jbjorner@qualitymetric.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To test the impact of the method of administration (MOA) on score level, reliability, and validity of scales developed in the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS).

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING:

Two nonoverlapping parallel forms each containing eight items from each of three PROMIS item banks (Physical Function, Fatigue, and Depression) were completed by 923 adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, or rheumatoid arthritis. In a randomized crossover design, subjects answered one form by interactive voice response (IVR) technology, paper questionnaire (PQ), personal digital assistant (PDA), or personal computer (PC) and a second form by PC, in the same administration. Method equivalence was evaluated through analyses of difference scores, intraclass correlations (ICCs), and convergent/discriminant validity.

RESULTS:

In difference score analyses, no significant mode differences were found and all confidence intervals were within the prespecified minimal important difference of 0.2 standard deviation. Parallel-forms reliabilities were very high (ICC = 0.85-0.93). Only one across-mode ICC was significantly lower than the same-mode ICC. Tests of validity showed no differential effect by MOA. Participants preferred screen interface over PQ and IVR.

CONCLUSION:

We found no statistically or clinically significant differences in score levels or psychometric properties of IVR, PQ, or PDA administration compared with PC.

KEYWORDS:

Item response theory; Method of administration; Mode of administration; Patient-reported outcomes; Quality of life; Questionnaire

PMID:
24262772
PMCID:
PMC4051417
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.07.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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