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Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2014 Feb;34(1):157-67. doi: 10.1016/j.iac.2013.09.005.

Immunologic contact urticaria.

Author information

1
Department of Cutaneous Allergy, St John's Institute of Dermatology, King's College, St Thomas' Hospital, Lambeth Palace Road, London SE1 7EH, UK. Electronic address: john.mcfadden@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

The wheal and flare reaction from direct contact with a chemical or protein agent is known as contact urticaria. Contact urticaria can be either nonimmunologic (no sensitization required) or immunologic (sensitization required). Immunologic contact urticaria often gives a more aggravated response and has the potential to spread from the local vicinity. Skin testing in immunologic contact urticaria gives a quicker response compared with skin testing in nonimmunologic contact urticaria. There are a wide variety of agents that can cause immunologic contact urticaria, and they can be either low-molecular-weight chemicals (haptens) or proteins.

KEYWORDS:

Atopic; Contact urticaria; Cosmetics; Food

PMID:
24262696
DOI:
10.1016/j.iac.2013.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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