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Neuroimage. 2014 Apr 1;89:203-15. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.11.012. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Randomized parcellation based inference.

Author information

1
Parietal Team, INRIA Saclay-Île-de-France, Saclay, France; CEA, DSV, I(2)BM, Neurospin bât 145, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette, France. Electronic address: benoit.da_mota@inria.fr.
2
Parietal Team, INRIA Saclay-Île-de-France, Saclay, France; CEA, DSV, I(2)BM, Neurospin bât 145, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette, France.
3
Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany; Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, UK.
5
Institute of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
6
Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
7
Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, UK; Department of Psychiatry, Universite de Montreal, CHU Ste. Justine Hospital, Canada.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
9
Institute of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA.
10
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM CEA Unit 1000 "Imaging & Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, Orsay, France; AP-HP Department of Adolescent Psychopathology and Medicine, Maison de Solenn, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France.
11
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, UK; Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Canada.
12
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
13
Neuroimaging Center, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
14
CEA, DSV, I(2)BM, Neurospin bât 145, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette, France.
15
CEA, DSV, I(2)BM, Neurospin bât 145, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette, France; Henry H. Wheeler Jr. Brain Imaging Center, University of California at Berkeley, USA.
16
Parietal Team, INRIA Saclay-Île-de-France, Saclay, France; CEA, DSV, I(2)BM, Neurospin bât 145, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette, France. Electronic address: bertrand.thirion@inria.fr.

Abstract

Neuroimaging group analyses are used to relate inter-subject signal differences observed in brain imaging with behavioral or genetic variables and to assess risks factors of brain diseases. The lack of stability and of sensitivity of current voxel-based analysis schemes may however lead to non-reproducible results. We introduce a new approach to overcome the limitations of standard methods, in which active voxels are detected according to a consensus on several random parcellations of the brain images, while a permutation test controls the false positive risk. Both on synthetic and real data, this approach shows higher sensitivity, better accuracy and higher reproducibility than state-of-the-art methods. In a neuroimaging-genetic application, we find that it succeeds in detecting a significant association between a genetic variant next to the COMT gene and the BOLD signal in the left thalamus for a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging contrast associated with incorrect responses of the subjects from a Stop Signal Task protocol.

KEYWORDS:

Group analysis; Multiple comparisons; Parcellation; Permutations; Reproducibility

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