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Eur J Neurol. 2014 Apr;21(4):577-85. doi: 10.1111/ene.12312. Epub 2013 Nov 22.

Clinical features and long-term prognosis of trochlear headaches.

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1
Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Trochlear headaches are a recently recognized cause of headache, of which both primary and inflammatory subtypes are recognized. The clinical features, long-term prognosis and optimal treatment strategy have not been well defined.

METHODS:

A cohort of 25 patients with trochlear headache seen at the Mayo Clinic between 10 July 2007 and 28 June 2012 were identified.

RESULTS:

The diagnosis of trochlear headache was not recognized by the referring neurologist or ophthalmologist in any case. Patients most often presented with a new daily from onset headache (n = 22, 88%). The most characteristic headache syndrome was reported as continuous, achy, periorbital pain associated with photophobia and aggravation by eye movement, especially reading. Individuals with a prior history of migraine were likely to have associated nausea and experience trochlear migraine. Amongst individuals with trochleitis, 5/12 (41.6%) had an identified secondary mechanism. Treatment responses were generally, but not invariably, favorable to dexamethasone/lidocaine injections near the trochlea. At a median follow-up of 34 months (range 0-68), 10/25 (40%) of the cohort had experienced complete remission.

CONCLUSIONS:

Trochlear headaches are poorly recognized, have characteristic clinical features, and often require serial injections to optimize the treatment outcome. The identification of trochleitis should prompt neuroimaging to look for a secondary cause.

KEYWORDS:

chronic daily headache; migraine; neuro-ophthalmology; ocular movements; secondary headache disorders; trochlea; trochleitis

PMID:
24261483
DOI:
10.1111/ene.12312
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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