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Arthritis. 2013;2013:621396. doi: 10.1155/2013/621396. Epub 2013 Oct 24.

Association of self-efficacy and outcome expectations with physical activity in adults with arthritis.

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1
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 West 168th Street, Room 512, New York, NY 10032, USA ; Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 3030 Bondurant Hall, CB No. 7135, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7135, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study is to determine whether higher baseline levels of (a) self-efficacy for physical activity, (b) self-efficacy for arthritis self-management, and (c) outcome expectations for exercise are associated with higher physical activity levels following an exercise intervention for adults with arthritis.

METHODS:

A secondary analysis of the intervention cohort (n = 130) within a randomized controlled trial of the People with Arthritis Can Exercise program was performed. Multiple linear regression evaluated the relationship between physical activity at a time point three months after the completion of an exercise intervention and three main explanatory variables.

RESULTS:

After controlling for baseline physical activity, neither self-efficacy for arthritis self-management nor outcome expectations for exercise related to three-month physical activity levels. There was a relationship between three-month physical activity and self-efficacy for physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Future research is needed to evaluate the ability of self-efficacy-enhancing programs to increase physical activity in adults with arthritis.

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