Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2013 Oct;23(8):1400-5. doi: 10.1097/IGC.0b013e3182a41dd8.

Mushroom intake and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in southern Chinese women.

Author information

1
*School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; and †Department of Community Health and Network Coordination, National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to investigate the association between mushroom consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in southern Chinese women.

METHODS:

A hospital-based case-control study was undertaken in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, from 2006 to 2008. Participants were 500 incident patients with epithelial ovarian cancer and 500 controls, with a mean (SD) age of 59 (6) years. Information on habitual mushroom consumption was obtained by face-to-face interview using a validated and reliable food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between mushroom intake and the ovarian cancer risk.

RESULTS:

The patients with ovarian cancer consumed less mushrooms (mean [SD], 28.48 [37.45] g/d) than did controls (mean [SD], 30.75 [41.85] g/d). Apparent reductions in cancer risk were found at high levels of intake, especially for the common white button mushroom with adjusted odds ratios 0.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.89) for women consuming more than 2 g per day relative to those who consume less than that (P = 0.005). Decreases in risk at high levels of intake were also observed for serous and mucinous subtypes of epithelial ovarian tumors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intake of mushrooms, particularly white button mushroom, seemed to be inversely associated with the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer in southern Chinese women.

PMID:
24257554
DOI:
10.1097/IGC.0b013e3182a41dd8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center