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Cereb Cortex. 2015 May;25(5):1188-97. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bht315. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

The impact of television viewing on brain structures: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses.

Author information

1
Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer.
2
Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer Division of Medical Neuroimaging Analysis, Department of Community Medical Supports, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization Department of Nuclear Medicine & Radiology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer.
3
Graduate School of Education.
4
Smart Ageing International Research Centre, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer.
5
Human and Social Response Research Division, International Research Institute of Disaster Science.
6
Division of Medical Neuroimaging Analysis, Department of Community Medical Supports, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization Graduate School of Education Department of Functional Brain Imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.

Abstract

Television (TV) viewing is known to affect children's verbal abilities and other physical, cognitive, and emotional development in psychological studies. However, the brain structural development associated with TV viewing has never been investigated. Here we examined cross-sectional correlations between the duration of TV viewing and regional gray/white matter volume (rGMV/rWMV) among 133 boys and 143 girls as well as correlations between the duration of TV viewing and longitudinal changes that occurred a few years later among 111 boys and 105 girls. After correcting for confounding factors, we found positive effects of TV viewing on rGMV of the frontopolar and medial prefrontal areas in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, positive effects of TV viewing on rGMV/rWMV of areas of the visual cortex in cross-sectional analyses, and positive effects of TV viewing on rGMV of the hypothalamus/septum and sensorimotor areas in longitudinal analyses. We also confirmed negative effects of TV viewing on verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. These anatomical correlates may be linked to previously known effects of TV viewing on verbal competence, aggression, and physical activity. In particular, the present results showed effects of TV viewing on the frontopolar area of the brain, which has been associated with intellectual abilities.

KEYWORDS:

children; gray matter volume; television; verbal; white matter volume

PMID:
24256892
DOI:
10.1093/cercor/bht315
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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