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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;68(1):125-30. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2013.238. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

Is undernutrition risk associated with an adverse clinical outcome in spinal cord-injured patients admitted to a spinal centre?

Author information

1
1] National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UK [2] School of Health Sciences, City University, London, UK [3] Centre for Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, University College, London, UK.
2
National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UK.
3
School of Health Sciences, City University, London, UK.
4
Centre for Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, University College, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate whether undernutrition risk measured using the Spinal Nutrition Screening Tool (SNST) and the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) is associated with worse clinical outcomes in respect of length of in-patient hospital stay (LOS) and mortality in the 12 months after admission to a spinal cord injuries (SCIs) centre.

METHODS:

A multicentre, prospective, cross-sectional observational study was conducted in four UK SCI centres (SCICs). A total of 150 SCI patients (aged 18-88 years (median: 44 years), 30.7% females) were studied between July 2009 and March 2010. LOS and mortality 12 months after admission to the SCIC was monitored. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify unique predictors of the variance of LOS.

RESULTS:

The patients initially undernourished or at risk of undernutrition (44.6%) had a significantly longer LOS (median (days): 129 vs 85, P=0.012) and greater 12-month mortality (% deceased: 9.2% vs 1.4%, P=0.036). In addition, serum albumin and new admission to an SCIC were identified as independent predictors for long LOS.

CONCLUSION:

The present study suggests that undernutrition risk, as identified by the SNST, is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Nutritional screening should be helpful in improving clinical outcomes if it promotes more appropriate and effective nutritional intervention.

PMID:
24253762
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2013.238
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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