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J Pediatr. 2014 Feb;164(2):327-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.10.009. Epub 2013 Nov 16.

Impact of the 2010 FIFA (Federation Internationale de Football Association) World Cup on Pediatric Injury and Mortality in Cape Town, South Africa.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of General Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Labatt Family Heart Center, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Division of General and Thoracic Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
5
Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Trauma Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa; ChildSafe (Formerly known as the Child Accident Prevention Foundation of Southern Africa), Cape Town, South Africa.
6
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of General and Thoracic Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: georges.azzie@sickkids.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine how a mass-gathering event (the Federation Internationale de Football Association World Cup, 2010, South Africa) impacts trauma and mortality in the pediatric (≤ 18 years) population.

STUDY DESIGN:

We investigated pediatric emergency visits at Cape Town's 3 largest public trauma centers and 3 private hospital groups, as well as deaths investigated by the 3 city mortuaries. We compared the 31 days of World Cup with equivalent periods from 2007-2009, and with the 2 weeks before and after the event. We also looked at the World Cup period in isolation and compared days with and without games in Cape Town.

RESULTS:

There was significantly decreased pediatric trauma volume during the World Cup, approximately 2/100,000 (37%) fewer injuries per day, compared with 2009 and to both pre- and post-World Cup control periods (P < .001). This decrease occurred within a majority of injury subtypes, but did not change mortality. There were temporal fluctuations in emergency visits corresponding with local match start time, with fewer all-cause emergency visits during the 5 hours surrounding this time (-16.4%, P = .01), followed by a subsequent spike (+26.2%, P = .02). There was an increase in trauma 12 hours following matches (+15.6%, P = .06).

CONCLUSIONS:

In Cape Town, during the 2010 Federation Internationale de Football Association World Cup, there were fewer emergency department visits for traumatic injury. Furthermore, there were fewer all-cause pediatric emergency department visits during hometown matches. These results will assist in planning for future mass-gathering events.

KEYWORDS:

FIFA; Federation Internationale de Football Association; ICD-10; International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision

PMID:
24252783
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.10.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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