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Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2014 Mar;5(2):95-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ttbdis.2013.08.005. Epub 2013 Nov 16.

First isolation of the relapsing fever spirochete, Borrelia hermsii, from a domestic dog.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 903 South 4th Street, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.
2
Kenmore Veterinary Hospital, Kenmore, WA, USA.
3
Phoenix Central Laboratories for Veterinarians, Mukilteo, WA, USA.
4
Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 903 South 4th Street, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA. Electronic address: tschwan@niaid.nih.gov.

Abstract

In North America, tick-borne relapsing fever of humans is most frequently caused by infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. Prior to our investigation, this spirochete was not known to infect dogs although another species, Borrelia turicatae, has been isolated from domestic canids in Florida and Texas. A clinically ill dog in Washington, USA, was spirochetemic upon examination. Spirochetes were isolated from the dog's serum and examined by PCR and multi-locus sequence typing. DNA sequences for 7 loci all typed the spirochete as B. hermsii and a member of genomic group II of this species. Therefore, companion dogs that reside in rustic cabins in higher elevation forests are at risk of infection with B. hermsii.

KEYWORDS:

Argasid ticks; Canine borreliosis; Ornithodoros hermsi; Relapsing fever; Veterinary pathogens

PMID:
24252262
PMCID:
PMC3946889
DOI:
10.1016/j.ttbdis.2013.08.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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