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Afr Health Sci. 2013 Sep;13(3):667-72. doi: 10.4314/ahs.v13i3.21.

Weight reduction improves markers of hepatic function and insulin resistance in type-2 diabetic patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing dramatically affecting up to 30% of the population worldwide. At present, treatment options are limited and pharmacological management of NAFLD has had disappointing results. Some of the best available evidence to improve NAFLD concerns lifestyle modification.

OBJECTIVE:

To detect the degree of weight reduction needed to improve the markers of hepatic function and insulin resistance in type-2 diabetics with NAFLD.

METHODS:

One hundred type-2 diabetic male patients with NAFLD were included into this study and divided into two equal groups. Group (A) received aerobic exercise training in addition to diet regimen. Group (B) received no treatment intervention.

RESULTS:

There was a 26.99%, 40.8%, 33.81%, 32.73%, 37.8% and 15 % reduction in mean values of Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP), Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST), Gamma - Glutamyltransferase (GGT) and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance-index (HOMA-IR) and BMI respectively in group (A) at the end of the study. While there were significant differences between mean levels of the investigated parameters in group (A) and group (B) after treatment.

CONCLUSION:

About 15 % reduction in BMI is effective to improve the liver condition and insulin resistance in type-2 diabetics with NAFLD.

KEYWORDS:

Non-alcoholic fatty liver; insulin resistance; markers of hepatic function; type-2 diabetes; weight reduction

PMID:
24250305
PMCID:
PMC3824460
DOI:
10.4314/ahs.v13i3.21
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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