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Am J Pharm Educ. 2013 Nov 12;77(9):196. doi: 10.5688/ajpe779196.

Pharmacy student engagement, performance, and perception in a flipped satellite classroom.

Author information

  • 1UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, UNC Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether "flipping" a traditional basic pharmaceutics course delivered synchronously to 2 satellite campuses would improve student academic performance, engagement, and perception.

DESIGN:

In 2012, the basic pharmaceutics course was flipped and delivered to 22 satellite students on 2 different campuses. Twenty-five condensed, recorded course lectures were placed on the course Web site for students to watch prior to class. Scheduled class periods were dedicated to participating in active-learning exercises. Students also completed 2 course projects, 3 midterm examinations, 8 graded quizzes, and a cumulative and comprehensive final examination.

ASSESSMENT:

Results of a survey administered at the beginning and end of the flipped course in 2012 revealed an increase in students' support for learning content prior to class and using class time for more applied learning (p=0.01) and in the belief that learning key foundational content prior to coming to class greatly enhanced in-class learning (p=0.001). Significantly more students preferred the flipped classroom format after completing the course (89.5%) than before completing the course (34.6%). Course evaluation responses and final examination performance did not differ significantly for 2011 when the course was taught using a traditional format and the 2012 flipped-course format. Qualitative findings suggested that the flipped classroom promoted student empowerment, development, and engagement.

CONCLUSION:

The flipped pharmacy classroom can enhance the quality of satellite students' experiences in a basic pharmaceutics course through thoughtful course design, enriched dialogue, and promotion of learner autonomy.

KEYWORDS:

distance learning; flipped classroom; pharmaceutics

PMID:
24249858
PMCID:
PMC3831407
DOI:
10.5688/ajpe779196
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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