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Primates. 2014 Apr;55(2):259-67. doi: 10.1007/s10329-013-0397-8. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Delayed response task performance as a function of age in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Copenhagen and National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, IPB, Bogor, Indonesia.
3
Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.
4
Primate Research Center, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Bogor, Indonesia.
5
Department of Veterinary Sciences, Michael E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA.
6
Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
7
Center for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
8
Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
9
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.
10
Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Copenhagen and National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. jhau@sund.ku.dk.
11
, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200, Copenhagen N, Denmark. jhau@sund.ku.dk.

Abstract

We compared delayed response task performance in young, middle-aged, and old cynomolgus monkeys using three memory tests that have been used with non-human primates. Eighteen cynomolgus monkeys--6 young (4-9 years), 6 middle-aged (10-19 years), and 6 old (above 20 years)--were tested. In general, the old monkeys scored significantly worse than did the animals in the two other age groups. Longer delays between stimulus presentation and response increased the performance differences between the old and younger monkeys. The old monkeys in particular showed signs of impaired visuo-spatial memory and deteriorated memory consolidation and executive functioning. These results add to the body of evidence supporting the utility of Macaca fascicularis in studies of cognition and as a potential translational model for age-associated memory impairment/dementia-related disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Neurodegenerative disease; Non-human primate; Working memory

PMID:
24248474
PMCID:
PMC3973945
DOI:
10.1007/s10329-013-0397-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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