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Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2014;37(3-4):246-56. doi: 10.1159/000356486. Epub 2013 Nov 15.

Serum lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin, and the risk of Alzheimer's disease mortality in older adults.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulating evidence shows that antioxidant-rich food reduces the risk of AD by inhibiting oxidative stress. This study investigates whether serum levels of carotenoids were associated with the risk of AD mortality in a nationally representative sample of US adults.

METHODS:

We used data from the Third Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES III) database and the NHANES III Linked Mortality File. A total of 6,958 participants aged older than 50 years were included in this study.

RESULTS:

We found that high serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin at baseline were associated with a lower risk of AD mortality after adjustment for potential covariates. The reduction in the mortality risk was progressively raised by increasing serum lycopene (HR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.10-0.69) and lutein+zeaxanthin (HR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.85) levels. In contrast, no associations with AD mortality were observed for other serum carotenoids, including alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin.

CONCLUSION:

High serum levels of lycopene and lutein+zeaxanthin are associated with a lower risk of AD mortality in adults. Our findings suggest that a high intake of lycopene- or lutein+zeaxanthin-rich food may be important for reducing the AD mortality risk.

PMID:
24247062
DOI:
10.1159/000356486
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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