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Health Psychol. 2014 Nov;33(11):1366-72. doi: 10.1037/hea0000004. Epub 2013 Nov 18.

Neighborhood problems and nocturnal blood pressure dipping.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego.
2
Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps Universit├Ąt.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Living in adverse neighborhood conditions has been linked with greater prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to learn whether perceived neighborhood problems are related to attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping, a risk factor for CVD morbidity.

METHOD:

A sample of 133 adults (71 male, 62 female; 80 White, 53 Black) underwent 24-hr ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The neighborhood problem scale (NPS) was used to assess neighborhood environmental stressors.

RESULTS:

Nocturnal dipping in systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure was reduced in individuals with higher NPS scores (p < .05). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that neighborhood problems explained 4%-6% of the variance in SBP, DBP, and MAP dipping (p < .05) even after adjusting for several theoretical confounders such as social status, age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), smoking, exercise, depression and discrimination.

CONCLUSION:

Neighborhood problems may contribute to attenuated BP dipping beyond the effect of known risk factors.

PMID:
24245839
PMCID:
PMC4266570
DOI:
10.1037/hea0000004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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