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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Dec 15;188(12):1413-9. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201305-0892OC.

Club cell protein 16 and disease progression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
1 University of British Columbia James Hogg Research Center and the Institute for Heart and Lung Health, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Erratum in

  • Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2014 Oct 1;190(7):843.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Club (Clara) cell protein 16 (CC-16) is a protein that is synthesized predominantly in the lungs and is detectable in serum. Its expression decreases with lung injury and smoking, and is thus a marker of bronchial cell dysfunction.

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the possibility of using serum CC-16 as a biomarker for disease progression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

METHODS:

We measured serum CC-16 levels from 4,724 subjects with mild-to-moderate airflow limitation in the Lung Health Study. Using a linear regression model, we determined the relationship of serum CC-16 concentrations to decline in lung function over 9 years. In addition, to determine whether CC-16 plays a major role in the pathogenesis of mild COPD, we exposed CC-16-deficient (-/-) mice to 6 months of cigarette smoke.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Reduced serum concentrations of CC-16 were associated with accelerated decline in FEV1 over 9 years (P < 0.0001), and this association persisted after adjustments for age, sex, race, smoking status, airway reactivity, body mass index, and baseline FEV1 (P = 0.0002). However, CC-16(-/-) mice did not demonstrate an enhanced risk of emphysema or small airway remodeling in response to cigarette smoke.

CONCLUSIONS:

Serum CC-16 is associated with disease progression, and may assist in the identification of "rapid progressors." However, the absence of CC-16 does not appear to modify the risk of cigarette-related COPD in mice.

PMID:
24245748
PMCID:
PMC3917377
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.201305-0892OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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