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PLoS One. 2013 Nov 14;8(11):e79149. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079149. eCollection 2013.

Cost-effectiveness and efficacy of spa, SCCmec, and PVL genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as compared to pulsed-field gel Electrophoresis.

Author information

1
Provincial Laboratory for Public Health, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is a valuable molecular typing assay used for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surveillance and genotyping. However, there are several limitations associated with PFGE. In Alberta, Canada, the significant increase in the number of MRSA isolates submitted to the Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (ProvLab) for PFGE typing led to the need for an alternative genotyping method. In this study, we describe the transition from PFGE to Staphylococcus protein A (spa), Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec), and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) typing. A total of 1915 clinical MRSA isolates collected from 2005 to 2009 were used to develop and validate an algorithm for assigning PFGE epidemic types using spa, SCCmec, and PVL typing and the resulting data was used to populate a new Alberta MRSA typing database. An additional 12620 clinical MRSA isolates collected from 2010 to 2012 as part of ongoing routine molecular testing at ProvLab were characterized using the new typing algorithm and the Alberta MRSA typing database. Switching to spa, SCCmec, and PVL from PFGE typing substantially reduced hands-on and turn-around times while maintaining historical PFGE epidemic type designations. This led to an approximate $77,000 reduction in costs from 2010 to 2012. PFGE typing is still required for a small subset of MRSA isolates that have spa types that are rare, novel, or associated with more than one PFGE epidemic type.

PMID:
24244440
PMCID:
PMC3828336
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0079149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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