Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Nanotechnol. 2014 Jan;9(1):33-8. doi: 10.1038/nnano.2013.229. Epub 2013 Nov 17.

Engineering myosins for long-range transport on actin filaments.

Author information

1
1] Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2].
2
Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
3
1] Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
4
1] Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
5
1] Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Abstract

Cytoskeletal motors act as cargo transporters in cells and may be harnessed for directed transport applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. High processivity, the ability to take many steps along a track before dissociating, is often a desirable characteristic because it allows nanoscale motors to transport cargoes over distances on the scale of micrometres, in vivo and in vitro. Natural processive myosins are dimeric and use internal tension to coordinate the detachment cycles of the two heads. Here, we show that processivity can be enhanced in engineered myosins using two non-natural strategies designed to optimize the effectiveness of random, uncoordinated stepping: (1) the formation of three-headed and four-headed myosins and (2) the introduction of flexible elements between heads. We quantify improvements using systematic single-molecule characterization of a panel of engineered motors. To test the modularity of our approach, we design a controllably bidirectional myosin that is robustly processive in both forward and backward directions, and also produce the fastest processive cytoskeletal motor measured so far, reaching a speed of 10 µm s(-1).

Comment in

PMID:
24240432
PMCID:
PMC4914611
DOI:
10.1038/nnano.2013.229
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center