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Immunol Lett. 2014 Mar-Apr;158(1-2):33-41. doi: 10.1016/j.imlet.2013.11.007. Epub 2013 Nov 14.

DCIR interacts with ligands from both endogenous and pathogenic origin.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Danone Research, Centre for Specialized Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Danone Research, Centre for Specialized Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands; Department of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: y.vankooyk@vumc.nl.

Abstract

C-type lectins on dendritic cells function as antigen uptake and signaling receptors, thereby influencing cellular immune responses. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) is one of the best-studied C-type lectin receptors expressed on DCs and its glycan specificity and functional requirements for ligand binding have been intensively investigated. The carbohydrate specificity of dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR), another DC-expressed lectin, was still debated, but we have recently confirmed DCIR as mannose/fucose-binding lectin. Since DC-SIGN and DCIR may potentially share ligands, we set out to elucidate the interaction of DCIR with established DC-SIGN-binding ligands, by comparing the carbohydrate specificity of DCIR and DC-SIGN in more detail. Our results clearly demonstrate that DC-SIGN has a broader glycan specificity compared to DCIR, which interacts only with mannotriose, sulfo-Lewis(a), Lewis(b) and Lewis(a). While most of the tested DC-SIGN ligands bound DCIR as well, Candida albicans and some glycoproteins on some cancer cell lines were identified as DC-SIGN-specific ligands. Interestingly, DCIR strongly bound human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp140 glycoproteins, while its interaction with the well-studied DC-SIGN-binding HIV-1 ligand gp120 was much weaker. Furthermore, DCIR-specific ligands were detected on keratinocytes. Furthermore, the interaction of DCIR with its ligands was strongly influenced by the glycosylation of DCIR. In conclusion, we show that sulfo-Lewis(a) is a high affinity ligand for DCIR and that DCIR interacts with ligands from both pathogenic and endogenous origin of which most are shared by DC-SIGN.

KEYWORDS:

C-type lectins; Dendritic cell; Glycan; Glycosylation; Pathogen and cancer

PMID:
24239607
DOI:
10.1016/j.imlet.2013.11.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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