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Appl Ergon. 2014 Jul;45(4):833-8. doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2013.10.014. Epub 2013 Nov 14.

Improvement of hand function using different surfaces and identification of difficult movement post stroke in the Box and Block Test.

Author information

1
Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA.
2
Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA. Electronic address: seon@uwm.edu.

Abstract

This study determined the impact of changing block surfaces on hand function, as well as identified particularly time-consuming movement components post stroke, measured by the Box and Block Test (BBT). Eight chronic stroke survivors and eight age- and gender-matched control subjects participated in this study. The BBT score (number of blocks moved) and time for seven movement components were compared for three different block surfaces (wood, paper, and rubber). The rubber blocks improved BBT scores 8% (compared to all other conditions) not only for control subjects but also for the paretic and non-paretic hands of stroke survivors, by reducing movement time for finger closing and contact-to-lift. Modifying daily objects' surfaces with rubber could help stroke survivors' hand function. The paretic hand displayed notably slower movement for contact-to-lift, transport-release, reach before barrier, and reach after barrier suggesting that therapies may focus on goal directed reaching and object grasping/releasing.

KEYWORDS:

BBT; Grip; Stroke

PMID:
24239565
DOI:
10.1016/j.apergo.2013.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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