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Am J Surg. 2014 Feb;207(2):255-9. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.08.027. Epub 2013 Oct 23.

A framework for professionalism in surgery: what is important to medical students?

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, Suite 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. Electronic address: mesulliv@usc.edu.
2
Department of Medical Education, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Department of Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, Suite 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purposes of this study were to develop a comprehensive framework for professionalism in surgery and to determine which attributes are most valued by medical students.

METHODS:

A framework for professionalism in surgery, consisting of 11 attribute categories, was developed. All 3rd-year medical students (n = 168) participated in a focus group and completed a questionnaire regarding their perceptions about professionalism. Students' responses were transcribed verbatim, coded, and assigned attribute categories.

RESULTS:

Students rated respect as the most important attribute of professionalism (56%), followed by altruism (21%) and interpersonal skills (8%). Fifty-three percent of students witnessed unprofessional behavior among faculty members while on the surgical clerkship. Of these incidents, 74% were related to respect, 28% to practice improvement, and 1% to altruism.

CONCLUSIONS:

Respect was rated as the single most important characteristic of professionalism and was the attribute with the most witnessed violations.

KEYWORDS:

Hidden curriculum; Professionalism; Undergraduate medical education

PMID:
24239531
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.08.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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