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Appetite. 2014 Feb;73:147-55. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2013.11.003. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

12 month changes in dietary intake of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities following the NEAT Girls cluster randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, HA12 Hunter Building, School of Health Sciences, University Drive, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: clare.collins@newcastle.edu.au.
2
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, ATC Building, School of Education, University Drive, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: deborah.dewar@newcastle.edu.au.
3
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, HA12 Hunter Building, School of Health Sciences, University Drive, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: tracy.schumacher@uon.edu.au.
4
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, ATC Building, School of Education, University Drive, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: tara.finn@newcastle.edu.au.
5
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, ATC Building, School of Education, University Drive, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: philip.morgan@newcastle.edu.au.
6
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, ATC Building, School of Education, University Drive, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: david.lubans@newcastle.edu.au.

Abstract

Poor dietary habits and obesity are more prevalent in lower socio-economic status (SES) communities. The NEAT Girls cluster randomized controlled trial was a school-based obesity prevention program targeting adolescent girls in low SES schools in NSW, Australia. The aim was to evaluate the 12-month impact of key nutrition program messages on dietary intake and food behaviors. Diet was assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Individual foods were categorized into nutrient-dense or energy-dense, nutrient-poor food groups and the percentage contribution to total energy intake calculated. Participants were aged 13.2±0.5years (n=330). There were no statistically significant group-by-time effects for dietary intake or food related behaviors, with 12-month trends suggesting more intervention group girls had improved water intakes (59% consuming⩽three glasses per day to 54% at 12 months vs. 50% to 61% in controls, p=0.052), with a greater proportion consuming < one sweetened beverage per day (24-41% vs. 34-37% in controls, p=0.057). Further research including more intensive nutrition intervention strategies are required to evaluate whether dietary intake in adolescent girls attending schools in low SES communities can be optimized.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Diet; Female; Intervention; Obesity prevention

PMID:
24239513
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2013.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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