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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;221(1):97-103. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2013.10.005. Epub 2013 Oct 31.

Cognitive processes associated with compulsive buying behaviours and related EEG coherence.

Author information

1
Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Faculty of Life & Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, PO. Box 218, Hawthorn Melbourne 3122, Australia.
2
Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Faculty of Life & Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, PO. Box 218, Hawthorn Melbourne 3122, Australia. Electronic address: jciorciari@swin.edu.au.

Abstract

The behavioural and cognitive phenomena associated with Compulsive Buying (CB) have been investigated previously but the underlying neurophysiological cognitive process has received less attention. This study specifically investigated the electrophysiology of CB associated with executive processing and cue-reactivity in order to reveal differences in neural connectivity (EEG Coherence) and distinguish it from characteristics of addiction or mood disorder. Participants (N=24, M=25.38 yrs, S.D.=7.02 yrs) completed the Sensitivity to Punishment Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire and a visual memory task associated with shopping items. Sensitivities to reward and punishment were examined with EEG coherence measures for preferred and non-preferred items and compared to CB psychometrics. Widespread EEG coherence differences were found in numerous regions, with an apparent left shifted lateralisation for preferred and right shifted lateralisation for non-preferred items. Different neurophysiological networks presented with CB phenomena, reflecting cue reactivity and episodic memory, from increased arousal and attachment to items.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Compulsive buying; EEG Coherence; Memory

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