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Neurobiol Aging. 2014 Apr;35(4):793-801. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.10.076. Epub 2013 Oct 11.

Neuroprotective effects of the amylin analogue pramlintide on Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and cognition.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH USA.
  • 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, Institute on Aging, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
  • 3Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH USA.
  • 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, Institute on Aging, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: steven.arnold@uphs.upenn.edu.
  • 5Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH USA. Electronic address: gxc40@case.edu.

Abstract

Amylin is a metabolic peptide hormone that is co-secreted with insulin from beta cells in the pancreas and activates many of the downstream targets of insulin. To investigate the relationship between this hormone and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we measured plasma human amylin levels in 206 subjects with AD, 64 subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and 111 subjects with no cognitive impairment and found significantly lower amylin levels among subjects with AD and mild cognitive impairment compared with the cognitively intact subjects. To investigate mechanisms underlying amylin's effects in the brain, we administered chronic infusions of the amylin analog pramlintide in the senescence-accelerated prone mouse, a mouse model of sporadic AD. Pramlintide administration improved performance in the novel object recognition task, a validated test of memory and cognition. The pramlintide-treated mice had increased expression of the synaptic marker synapsin I and the kinase cyclin-dependent kinase-5 in the hippocampus, as well as decreased oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in the hippocampus. A dose-dependent increase in cyclin-dependent kinase-5 and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated-kinases 1/2 by pramlintide treatment in vitro was also present indicating functionality of the amylin receptor in neurons. Together these results suggest that amylin analogs have neuroprotective properties and might be of therapeutic benefit in AD.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Amylin; CDK5; Diabetes; IAPP; Incretin; Insulin; Pramlintide; SAMP8; Synaptic plasticity

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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