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J Endod. 2013 Dec;39(12):1576-80. doi: 10.1016/j.joen.2013.08.007. Epub 2013 Sep 21.

The number of bleaching sessions influences pulp tissue damage in rat teeth.

Author information

1
Department of Endodontics, Araçatuba Dental School, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: lucianocintra@foa.unesp.br.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Hydrogen peroxide tooth bleaching is claimed to cause alterations in dental tissue structures. This study investigated the influence of the number of bleaching sessions on pulp tissue in rats.

METHODS:

Male Wistar rats were studied in 5 groups (groups 1S-5S) of 10 each, which differed by the number (1-5) of bleaching sessions. In each session, the animals were anesthetized, and 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was applied to 3 upper right molars. Two days after the experimental period, the animals were killed, and their jaws were processed for light microscope evaluation. Pulp tissue reactions were scored as follows: 1, no or few inflammatory cells and no reaction; 2, <25 cells and a mild reaction; 3, between 25 and 125 cells and a moderate reaction; and 4, 125 or more cells and a severe reaction. Results from each experimental group were compared between groups and within groups to the corresponding unbleached upper left molars and analyzed for significant differences using the Kruskal-Wallis test (P < .05).

RESULTS:

All tissue sections showed significant bleaching-induced changes in the dental pulp. After 1 bleaching session, necrotic tissue in the pulp horns and underlying inflammatory changes were observed. The extent and intensity of these changes increased with the number of bleaching sessions. After 5 sessions, the changes included necrotic areas in the pulp tissue involving the second third of the radicular pulp and intense inflammation in the apical third.

CONCLUSIONS:

The number of bleaching sessions directly influenced the extent of pulp damage.

KEYWORDS:

Hydrogen peroxide; pulp reaction; tooth bleaching

PMID:
24238450
DOI:
10.1016/j.joen.2013.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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