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Biol Psychol. 2014 Jan;95:96-107. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.11.001. Epub 2013 Nov 11.

Replication of elite music performance enhancement following alpha/theta neurofeedback and application to novice performance and improvisation with SMR benefits.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW, UK. Electronic address: j.gruzelier@gold.ac.uk.
2
Trinity/Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London, UK.
3
Imperial College Medical School, London, UK.
4
Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW, UK.

Abstract

Alpha/theta (A/T) and sensory-motor rhythm (SMR) neurofeedback were compared in university instrumentalists who were novice singers with regard to prepared and improvised instrumental and vocal performance in three music domains: creativity/musicality, technique and communication/presentation. Only A/T training enhanced advanced playing seen in all three domains by expert assessors and validated by correlations with learning indices, strongest with Creativity/Musicality as shown by Egner and Gruzelier (2003). Here A/T gains extended to novice performance - prepared vocal, improvised vocal and instrumental - and were recognised by a lay audience who judged the prepared folk songs. SMR learning correlated positively with Technical Competence and Communication in novice performance, in keeping with SMR neurofeedback's known impact on lower-order processes such as attention, working memory and psychomotor skills. The importance of validation through learning indices was emphasised in the interpretation of neurofeedback outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Alpha/theta; Creativity; Improvisation; Music; Neurofeedback; SMR

PMID:
24231602
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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