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J Crohns Colitis. 2014 May;8(5):409-20. doi: 10.1016/j.crohns.2013.10.004. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

Coping is excellent in Swiss Children with inflammatory bowel disease: results from the Swiss IBD cohort study.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, University Children's Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
2
Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
3
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, University Children's Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Cantons Hospital Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
5
Division of Gastroenterology, University Children's Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
6
Division of Gastroenterology, University Children's Hospital Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
7
Division of Gastroenterology, University Children's Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
8
Division of Gastroenterology, Children's Hospital Lucerne, Lucerne, Switzerland.
9
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
10
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, University Children's Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland; Children's Research Centre, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: christian.braegger@kispi.uzh.ch.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) starting during childhood has been assumed to impair quality of life (QoL) of affected children. As this aspect is crucial for further personality development, the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed in a Swiss nationwide cohort to obtain detailed information on the fields of impairment.

METHODS:

Data were prospectively acquired from pediatric patients included in the Swiss IBD Cohort Study. IBD activity was evaluated by PCDAI and PUCAI. The age adapted KIDSCREEN questionnaire was evaluated for 110 children with IBD (64 with Crohn's disease 46 with ulcerative colitis). Data were analyzed with respect to established reference values of healthy controls.

RESULTS:

In the KIDSCREEN index a moderate impairment was only found for physical wellbeing due to disease activity. In contrast, mental well-being and social support were even better as compared to control values. A subgroup analysis revealed that this observation was restricted to the children in the German speaking part of Switzerland, whereas there was no difference compared to controls in the French part of Switzerland. Furthermore, autonomy and school variables were significantly higher in the IBD patients as compared to controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

The social support for children with IBD is excellent in this cohort. Only physical well-being was impaired due to disease activity, whereas all other KIDSCREEN parameters were better as compared to controls. This indicates that effective coping and support strategies may be able to compensate the burden of disease in pediatric IBD patients.

KEYWORDS:

Coping; Mental well-being; Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease; Physical well-being; Social support

PMID:
24230970
DOI:
10.1016/j.crohns.2013.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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